the radical rational…

in search of innovative ideas with a well-balanced approach for the math classroom

Student Reflection on HW

on November 23, 2013

When I get back from a conference, I have the best intentions of sharing, but its nearly 3 weeks later and I am just starting to get caught up…only to realize there are less than 3 weeks of instructional time before Christmas break. 

Starting to stress in my Geometry blocks classes…similarity (although I tied in some with our congruence unit and they used dilations in our transformations unit…) right triangles and circles…then a super dooper quick approach to modeling via 3-d problems.  Anyone have an amazing project that ties circles and right triangles together?  Anyway, a bit off topic, because the stress causes me not to focus.

  I attended a session led by @ottensam sharing different approaches to ensure we are integrating the SMPs in our instruction.  He was very engaging and shared some simple, research-based strategies.

A great idea he shared was to change up the way we approach homework.  One simple suggestion was to ask students to eflect on the problems…which were most alike? Most different?  Why? Which one did you think was easiest? Most difficult, why?  I had students to do a quick write using this idea this past week.  Once they were finished, they had to meet with someone they did not sit next to and share their responses.  Finally, I called on students, asking them to share -not what they had written- but something they had heard. 

I am always amazed at student responses when I use startegies similar to this and could kick myself for not being more intentional, more often.  Several shared exact similar/different pairings but for totally different reasons.  I love it, being able to see and hear their ideas and thinking. 

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4 responses to “Student Reflection on HW

  1. Great idea. Truthfully, I hate assigning homework and I hate checking it. But I know mine is a counter productive attitude, sigh. So I think your idea could help me because it gives a culminating activity to each homework. Thanks for sharing!

  2. Jasmine says:

    Do you mean the equation of a circle? Use distance formula to tie them together. Distance comes from Pythagorean and is used to make the equation of a circle.

    • Pam Wilson says:

      Thanks Jasmine but we did that earlier in the semester. I am looking at similarity, right triangle trig and special segment relationships in circles with less than 2 weeks left…

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