Thoughts on #75facts

Standard

As I read SimplifyRadicals #75facts post this morning, it really got me to thinking…about things I do and how I could use “Create the Problem” in my own classroom.

I’ve given students the answer before and asked them to write a scenario that could model the problem.  But reading her refelction and suggestions for modifications helped me realize a couple of ways I could improve the way I’ve done this in the past.

The FACT reminds me of ideas from More Good Questions, Marian Small & Amy Lin.  Give students the answer and they have to come up with the equation/problem.  Example, the slope is 2/3, what are 2 points that could give you this slope?

As suggested in the FACT#11 description, providing students with an open ended task takes their thinking to another level.  Student examples generate whether they know why a computation is performed rather than just knowing a procedure.  But this FACT actually asks them, not to find the computation/problem, but to give a scenario/context where this strategy could be used to solve the problem.

The key, as with many successful strategies, is sharing student ideas.  Not just allowing them to talk about their examples and how their story matches the solution, but the teacher asking the class for feedback on whether it is a match, if not, how could it be changed/made better (pg. 81)?

This reminds me of another FACT I’ve used in class before “2 stars and 1 wish.”  however, when I first saw this a couple of years ago, it was called 2 +’s and a delta…two positives and one thing I’d like to change.  Playing off of My Favorite No, I ask students “What do I know this student understands?  Give me 2 examples of what this student did well.”  By focusing on the correct parts first, especially if I’m using a student’s example (anonymously) – the student can see it wasn’t completely wrong.

Then for the delta (wish), I ask students not to point out the mistake, but to think of a question they could ask the student to help the student realize their mistake.  Sometimes, this is a tough task, depending on the mistake that was made, but by asking a question, students, again, are having to think on a different level.

In several of the Formative Assessment Lessons from the MARS site (Solving Linear Equations in Two Variables) – the lesson format actually allows students in small groups to evaluate different levels of student work.  On a slide in the projector resources for this lesson, Assessing Student Work, students are given these questions to guide their discussions:

You are the teacher and have to assess this work.

Correct the work and write comments on the accuracy and organization of each response.

•What do you like about this student’s work?
•What method did the student use?
Is it clear? Is it accurate?  Is it efficient?
•What errors did the student make?
•How might the work be improved?
My thinking, use the FACT #11 – Create a Problem as an exit slip.  Divide the responses into different levels.  On overhead, share different levels, both correct/incorrect, as well as different approaches, using the above questions as a guide for class discussion.  Then present students with solution(s) and ask them to create a problem.
Thanks to Simplifying Radicals for getting my brain to churning so early this morning!

 

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