All Student Response Cards #made4math Monday

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In reading Embedded Formative Assessment (Wiliam, 2011), there have been several practical techniques presented in each chapter.  While discussing chapter 4, @druinok suggested creating response cards this summer, based on the technique All Students Respond.

  I had seen a set made by an elementary teacher in my leadership network.  She had several cards labeled with letters, hole-punched and attached to a 3 inch ring that could be opened and placed around the metal frame on student desks. She explained students always had access to them.

I kept thinking about how to accomplish the same idea for my classroom.  I had a package of name badge holders I had picked up at our Mighty Dollar in town, but never found a use for them.  Basically, I put this example together quickly, to have something for #made4math today. Its not innovative, but for anyone who does not have a “clicker system” or devices to use with Poll-Everywhere, etc., its an option that I believe could prove as a useful tool.

My idea is to have a single card, with all responses.  I would need to ‘train’ students how to hold their cards allowing me to see their response clearly.  Mine is double sided, this could easily be accomplished with cardstock printed, then laminated if you didnt have the badge holders.  Each student could clip one into a pocket of their INB and have them on hand when its time to use them.  Or they could be clipped either to a hanging ribbon or the side of a magnetic cabinet, even placed in a basket if you only had one classroom set.

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The first side includes a favorite of mine…always, sometimes, never…color coding green, yellow, red, respectively.  The student places their hand, so only the response they choose is visible and located at the top of the card when they hold it up for me to see.  I didn’t have the color circle stickers here at home, but I believe they may help in the visual for me to see.  By keeping responses color coded, I can quickly scan the room to see where students are, then make a decision as to what type of question follows or if we should procceed with discussion of why they responded as they did…supporting their claims with mathematical evidence, of course.

Notice, the QUESTION response.  A student may have a question or require some clarification, this choice doesn’t allow them to opt out, but provides a way to say, I need some help.

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On the back side, there are simply color-coded (different from other side) multiple choice responses, again to allow a quick scan before deciding how to proceed.  If multiple answers are chosen, begin by asking students to give possible reasons why a student may have chosen A or D-the other answer, if I chose A, could I figure out how someone else would have chosen D?  I also like to ask, noone chose B or C, what is a possible reason why someone would not have chosen  ___?

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Like I said, I plan to use color circle stickers which allow me to see student responsesmfrom across the room.  I am debating on howmto do true/false.  Would

it suffice to simply use the green and red on ASN side for this?

Ideas, suggestions for how to make these response cards better are welcomed!

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3 responses »

  1. Maybe for true/false have one side printed on red paper for false and the other side printed on green for true? Or if you don’t want to use red/green paper maybe the word true in the middle on one side and false in the middle on the other. Just a thought. Thanks for sharing. Now on my to do list for the summer.

  2. I do A/B review where the questions are multiple choice with two possible answers – A or B. I write A on one tongue depressor and B on the other. I do one in red and one in blue to help me see too. It is my low tech clicker system. I guess you could do a C and D on the other ends and have 4 choices.

  3. I don’t have any suggestions, but I love that book you mentioned! Our school has it in the PD library and I was thinking of getting my own copy so I can write all over it.

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