Student Led Discussions, but wait a minute…

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As I read this article, I wondered, how often do I engage in rich discussions with colleagues?

Yes, I feel comfortable with my online PLN, and I have a handful of colleagues who don’t gawk at me when I start talking about a book or article I read.  But for the most part, I avoid saying things when I am around certain people because the conversation doesn’t continue.  Uncomfortable silence. 

That’s why I find myself avoiding it altogether. 

I wonder if I followed an idea like #eduread and shared an article with colleagues, something doable that’s not an entire book…to read prior to our PLC. 

  It seems when I ask for suggestions, nothing.  I don’t know if this is because they don’t want to do it, or really aren’t sure where to start.  So I let it go. And that’s not effective leadership. I suppose I am paranoid, not wanting others to feel that I am judging their teaching when I suggest an article.  I honestly want to talk, discuss, share ideas…so I can have better learning opportunities for my students.

Anyway, how do you start rich conversations with colleagues? 

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2 responses »

  1. Pam – my first thought in response to your question was “I go to Exeter/TMC and the rich conversation flows.” Like you, I frequently find myself talking into the void when I express the thoughts that so easily and abundantly flow on Twitter. My AP always tells me she appreciates me when I try to open up a discussion, but there is still no local forum for a conversation. I continue to speak out whenever possible, but to be honest, with limited time and energy each day, I will focus on rich conversation with my students.

    I like the idea of having a focal point for the discussion; it sounds like it would make it easier for people who are not used to talking to a group in that way, and it would make it easier for you to lead.

  2. Send out a blogpost! 🙂 I have a distribution list (optional) for the teachers in my department, and it’s a pretty simple way to start conversations without feeling like someone is getting picked on. And I know at least two teachers now are following a bunch of blogs on their own!

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