Looking Back 2016-2017 (Part 2) Class Closure, Verifying Solutions, 3 Things

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My original intention with yesterday’s post was to discuss these items, but someone HW / Independent Practice hijacked the post (I have more thoughts to revisit that post soon!).

Class / Lesson Close

As mentioned yesterday, one of my professional growth goals was to improve on lesson and class closure.  I knew I had to become very intentional with it, but how could I hold myself accountable?

As school began, I created daily alarms on my FitBit for 6 minutes prior to the end of each class.  I tried some other times, but the 6 minutes worked best for me – I knew I had 1 minute to wrap up / tie together what we were doing – then allow students to actively reflect on the day / lesson.  I kept the alarms on the entire year – with a brief break when my flex died and I was waiting for my alta to arrive.  I finally deleted the alarms a couple of weeks after the end of the spring semester.

This one simple tool – made such a difference for me.  Yes, there were days – the close did not wrap up as smoothly as I had envisioned, but this is one thing I will definitely continue.  As for the closure tasks I used – anything from an exit slip, a post-it note quiz with stop-light self assessment, reflection on the lesson with choose a sentence to complete: Something I learned…, Something I was reminded of…, Something I realized…; What 2 problems were most challenging?  What questions do you still have?, 2-minute reflection grid, etc.  I will post more ideas on these closure tasks later.

List 3 Things You Notice About the Graph

A habit that began with this task True / False Statements about Graphs, was a win for students.  I continued throughout the semester to have them cover up ANY questions / statements about the given graph and always list at least 3 things they noticed / knew about the graph in a bullet list.  How we shared their noticings varied, but it became automatic for them to jot 3 things in the margins beside any graph prior to jumping in to the question.  Even on the EOC exam, I noticed multiple students jotting things they noticed in the margins, without being instructed to do so.

Verify Your Answer

Years ago, when I used Hands-On Equations System, I found how effective it was for students to substitute their solution back into the equation to check their answer.  Last year, I was reminded of this and I wondered, why / when did I stop doing this?  And I began requiring it again.  Its imperative.  And I continued using it again this past season.

Whether it was a 1-variable equation equation, 2 variable linear equation (x,y) or an inequality statement, students were asked to verify their solution algebraically by substitution.  If nothing else it is a test-tasking strategy they can use on standardized MC tests.  But more importantly, they began to see connections between the equations and comparing the functions related to both sides of the equation.  They began seeing connections with the graphs of those related functions – parallel / same lines with no solutions and identities or the point of intersection.  AND  this extends to all function / equati0n types.

But most importantly, they began supporting their answer with reasoning / evidence of their arrival at a possible solution.  They were verifying their answers – but also that of their peers.

What are some of your non-negotiable structures you have implemented with success in your classroom?

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One response »

  1. Pam, I love the creative use of your FitBit alarms, but I also love the idea of the two-minute reflection grid. Is there more about this somewhere on your site?

    – Elizabeth (@cheesemonkeysf)

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