Literacy Strategies for Improving Mathematics Instruction

Standard

Wrapped up our twitter book chat this week over

#lit4math – Literacy Strategies for Improving Mathematics Instruction by Joan M. KenneyEuthecia HancewicLoretta Heuer .

You can read (here) how I am not a fan of writing and words.  Literacy – communication – its all the same, in my opinion;  You can read, write, speak – but its all to share/get information, right?  I do realize the importance of providing students with strategies that will help them succeed, to give them opportunities to write and talk about their thinking can be a key component in their learning to help expand their understanding of certain concepts.  I look at this chance to learn about literacy in math as a way I can learn with my students – to be open that words are my weakness – but by facing my fear – something I struggle with – I can help them realize words are not the enemy either.  I am able to help them learn this “new language” called math and share ways of conquering it !

Though this book did not end as strongly and wow! as it began, it was worth my time.  Chapter 1 really pulled me in, causing me to think about my classroom, questioning some of my strategies and left me craving more!  It showed me how students – who are not as math-minded – can struggle because they view concepts differently.  Chapters 2 and 3 – gave me tools / suggestions of ways I could provide students with opportunities to share – ways I could become more aware of their thinking – and prepare for their struggles.  Through our chats, I was able reflect how I could improve things I am currently doing – but also looking at new ways of viewing mathematical text and ideas (literacy really isn’t a 4-letter word).

The remainder of the book, well, I was diasppointed – but would still recommend at least a skim – because there are some key ideas – but mostly, some great articles/research mentioned you may wish to take a look at as well.

I’ve linked to catalog from Storify of our Twitter Chats – again, some good thoughts – good articles and links.  Also, take a look here, Teaching Statistics Blog offers some reflection with posts from reading the book in 2010.

June 11 – Chapter 1 Mathematics as a Language

June 14 – Chapter 2 Reading in the Mathematics Classroom

June 18 – Chapter 3 Writing in the Mathematics Classrom

June 21 – Chapter 4 Graphic Representation in the Mathematics Classroom

June 25 – Chapter 5 Discourse in Mathematics Classroom

June 28 – Chapter 6 Creating Mathematical Metis

All in all – it really boils down to becoming aware of those struggles students will encounter and being ready to help them bridge past that struggle.  Notice I didn’t say be the bridge – productive struggle is a good thing.  We must give them opportunities to read, write and share – expanding their understanding by listening to other learners.  When they write about their thinking – cognitive demand is much higher.  We must listen to their conversations – not always answering their questions, but providing them with questions that will move their thinking deeper.  When they talk, discuss, even argue over a solution – they have greater opportunities to build connections as opposed to a sit-n-get teacher centered classroom.

My summary:

 ‏@pamjwilson to get students actively engaged, the tchr must 1st be actively engaged- listen, question, be less helpful #lit4math

Advertisements

2 responses »

  1. Pingback: Intimidated, Overwhelmed, Intrusive… Wanting to Join in… #MTBoS | the radical rational...

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s